Project Consulting Rates and More

I’m still working on this page. I apologize for the inconvenience.
If you’re looking for immediate film or video project advice please use this  – Contact Me –   link to send me an email. Please put “Film Project Consult” in the subject line and let me know a little about the project.  I’ll get back to you right away.
* Be sure to put “Film Project Consult” I do get some spam and get a little trash happy:) I wouldn’t want your message to get lost.
Thanks
John
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You’ve arrives Film & video project consulting page. If you didn’t get here from a link on the Video & Film Production – Project Consulting Services please use this link to give the page a quick read. The setup discussion is important to navigating this page.
Ok, so you’re looking for help and you want to know how much it costs, what can I do for you, and is it worth it.
Let me start with is it worth it. The value of what I have to offer is largely dependent on where you are in the filmmakers journey. If you’re a brand new filmmaker with a small project I’m probably going to work with you as a career coach.
Phase I – Expectation Alignment Evaluation
Every consultation starts with evaluating the projects needs, the projects resources and the needs of the producer and director.
Here’s what I’m can help you with.
To start we need to evaluate your project.

We need to define what it is you want the project to do for you. What rewards do you want this project to deliver?

  • What this project could do for you financially?
  • Do you expect it to help you get positive exposure amongst a community and peers or potential clients?
  • Is this project strictly an opportunity to learn about the craft of filmmaking, a way to walk through the mechanics of the process.
  • what state is your project in the production cycle.
  • How well is it positioned in terms of resources.

We need to define the scope of your project in terms of:

  • How many shooting days are needed
  • How big your crew should be
We need get clear about what we have to work with including:
  • Your skills
  • the skills of your team

 

Phase II – Packaging your project for investors. 

Every project needs investors, even the small ones. At the very least you’re asking cast and crew to give you the best deal they can. If they’re giving you a deal they’re an investor. people who own locations are investing and of course if anyone give the project money they’re an investor. Everybody wants something for their efforts.
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How do we set a project up for success? 
1. The first and most important thing every filmmaker must do before beginning a project is to define what it is you want the project to do for you. What rewards do you want this project to deliver?
  • What if anything do you expect the project do for you financially?
  • Do you expect it to help you get positive exposure amongst a community and peers or potential clients?
  • Is this project strictly an opportunity to learn about the craft of filmmaking, a way to walk through the mechanics of the process.

To best design a project that helps build a solid launch platform the filmmaker must:

  • take into account their own skills and the resources they have at their disposal
  • decide at what quality level this project must perform
  • challenge himself to stretch out of his comfort zone and show creative advancement in both skill and style
  • understand what the next milestone is a extend themselves to reach it.
If you’d like help evaluating your project
Project consultation is offered at three phases. 
Phase #1 – Filmmaker Exploration & Early growth. This is an advanced form of career coaching. The project is designed after an skills and resource evaluation has been completed. A script is written or the filmmaker teams up with a writer depending on what’s discovered during the evaluation process.
Phase #2 – Setting your project up for success. This phase recognizes that the filmmakers has already committed, but hasn’t started pre-production. Consulting at this stage ensures the project is structured for maximum success.
Phase #3 – Project realignment.  Here the filmmaker has already begun pre-production and has recognized need to evaluate the decisions made and resources at hand.
If you’re a first time or even novice filmmaker your project should be set up to deliver knowledge and to some extent exposure rewards. Once you’ve proven you can deliver a quality film both on-time and on-budget a project should be designed to make money and open doors to more opportunities.
The hard truth is if you want to be a really good filmmaker you need to make a lot of films and sooner or later you need to work from a strategy. The sooner the better. The earlier you work with a strategy that includes milestone goals the sooner you’ll reach the important ones.
For long term success to occur, every filmmaker needs to be building a platform from which to launch important projects.
Each of these individual projects must be designed as a building block and help give the platform strength. Here’s the formula.
To best design a project that helps build a solid launch platform the filmmaker must:
  • take into account their own skills and the resources they have at their disposal
  • decide at what quality level this project must perform
  • challenge himself to stretch out of his comfort zone and show creative advancement in both skill and style
  • understand what the next milestone is a extend themselves to reach it.
Creating a successful filmmaking and video production career is a long game, but as anyone who played can tell you it’s a series of little success that makes finishing the journey possible.
Evertime you make a even a tiny short little movie your moving the success needle in a positive direction. With the right strategy you can put in the same input of work and often less and get the same or better results. This means you’ll either get to important millstone accomplishments fasters or in some cases you’ll be able to skip over some.
There’s are times in your journey to take small steps and times to take big leaps know when can make all the difference.
Each project must be designed with the end goal in mind.
The typical problem
The novice filmmaker doesn’t know how to break a production into it’s parts. They know very little or zero about the mechanics of the process.